On Jessica and the Other.

As a writer tackling classical work and characters I’ve not had a problem feeling a contemporary resonance in the words, performance, character, form of anything we have produced. Yet, with Jessica In Spring I specifically wanted to address the tone, vitriol and horrendous narrative that has become a part of our politics, our media and our life over the past few years.

Brexit, Trump – 2016 was a year that apart from anything else legitimised voices that Othered. ‘Us’ and ‘Them’ – let’s blame poor people, people with a disability, different gender, immigrants, those who do not look like us. Let us not turn in and look at ourselves, let us not look to work together; let us point fingers and be rude, because that is Presidential, isn’t it?*

So Jessica came out of this place, of giving a voice to this Other – to someone who is Othered by circumstances, birth and also in her choices. Her choice to convert and marry out of her religion gives her some level of acceptance in society but she can never truly become part of the world she has made the choice to ‘join’ because she knows it for the sham it is.  Like those of us who are Othered, she knows much more of the world and her place in it than someone who has never been in that situation. I wanted her to articulate the fierceness that comes with this knowledge.

The concept of privilege is interesting to me because awareness has some bearing upon it but also those who are resolutely unaware often have the most. Jessica is privileged in some ways but she’s also Jewish and a woman in a time where she was legally a chattel of first her father and then her husband. It her experience as the Other experience that rounds her person into who her husband fell in love with – she dares the listener and him to accept her for all she is, shadows and all – rather than a beautiful construct of a good little wife. Ultimately that’s who we all are. People. I think Jessica speaks of that.

In Spring too, we have all these connotations of ‘new life’ and ‘rebirth’ of the year but this can be sad too. She is someone (in our version) who actively embraces this duality. I think her words in voiceover over the moving images works really nicely to communicate this. There are layers to her that she won’t deny.

Jessica In Soulilouqy from In Souliloquy on Vimeo.

 

So please watch AND listen – both, together, separately. She has something other to say.

 

x Tilly

 

*FFS. No it’s not and I know Orange McOrangeFace won’t read this but omg, ew, what an awful excuse for a human.

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Happy (belated) #Shakespeare401 Everyone!

We hosted a little party on the 23rd April – here are some of our photos celebrating Shakepeare’s Death (and Birth) Day!

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Such gorgeous and very serious guests!

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And cake!

We got a little bit glammed up.

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A big fat thank you to everyone we worked with over the past year (there’s a whole lot of you) and a big fat thank you to William Shakespeare – you’re a pretty awesome bloke!

xxx

Et Tu: Sebastian & Petruchio Filming – behind the scenes!

Welcome to our exclusive and exciting behind the scenes fun of our first Et Tu shoot!

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A moody Petruchio, brooding and all out of love awaits the company of Sebastian… reviewing his lines? There were so many great moments on this day!

 

At times it was very serious. And very fun.

We had a long day in the Players Bar (thanks to the Charing Cross Theatre for hosting our boy and their little drama). Many thanks again to George Turner (Petruchio) and William Sebag-Montfiore (Sebastian) for joining the team to work on Easter Sunday!

Hope you all had a lovely break – stay tuned for more behind the scenes easter eggs (totally went there) and updates as it gets edited and leading up to the release!

 

 

Et Tu: Sebastian & Petruchio @ Briefs!

Thank you to everyone who was involved with our very successful live performance of Et Tu: Sebastian & Petruchio at Briefs XVI. It was an incredibly fun experience for us from writing, through casting, directing, rehearsals and performance.

One of the hightlights was working with the exceptional actors: George Turner and Jonathan Edward Cobb. Absolutely cracking!

Here are some great photos (by Shaun Kitchener) from the dress rehearsal.

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(Note the socks).

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(Well, love often needs a drink)

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(You’re still talking? Still here? Well fine. We’ll sort it out then…)

This was a bit of an experiment for us, playing with how in a new writing night how this work would fit but the feedback we got was great – including people who didn’t necessarily know the characters.

Thanks to Shaun and West Avenue Theatre Company for producing the evening and all those lovely people we had in the audience. It was an experiment well worth doing and we enjoyed the journey as much as the outcome.

Both of us are still bubbling with warm and fuzzies.

Stay tuned for further Et Tu news and developments!

xx